Marinace says ESA has made incredible strides in representing the industry, but there is more work to be done
Marshall Marinace is on a mission -
to continue to infuse value into ESA
If you haven’t met Marshall Marinace, you probably will soon. He’s the new President of the Electronic Security Association (ESA), and he’s instantly likeable. He’s a homespun security dealer with decades of service who knows that the new world of systems integration requires change and involvement of every member at the association level.

Marinace was sworn in as the 41st President at ESX Nashville in June and took office on July 1, 2014. He has served as Vice President for nine years and is the former Chairperson of the Membership Committee. He’s on the Board of Directors of Security America Risk Retention Group (SARRG) and was involved with the Standards/Fire Life Safety Committee.  Marinace is the former President of both the New York Burglar and Fire Alarm Association, now known as the New York State Electronic Security Association (NYSESA), and the Regional Alarm Association. Marinace is the kind of person who always takes time from his busy schedule for an interview or to speak one-on-one with members about concerns or issues.

He’s passionate about the alarm business, beginning his career as an installer and launching Marshall Alarm Systems Corp., Yorktown Heights, N.Y., in 1976 with wife Michele, Vice President. Like many companies in the industry, it’s a family operation. Sons Matthew and Marshall Jr. have been working at the company for about eight years, and daughter Jessica’s husband also works for the company.

ESA has six critical strategic initiatives, long-range plans
that tie to its overall mission
and vision to 'lead the electronic
life safety, security and systems integration industry for the
benefit of our members,
consumers and public safety'

Now he’s on another mission: To continue to infuse value into the organization and encourage active involvement and participation. He knows the security industry is changing, and dealers have to adjust and embrace change. And he believes associations only work — and can only attain real impact — if members are active.

“Associations are unique organizations,” he says. “They depend on members to guide the organization and its numerous committees, taking time from the day-to-day of running a business to volunteer for the greater good of the industry. And it isn’t easy. Most ESA members are smaller, independent organizations with one to 50 employees. It’s difficult to take time out from running operations or helping a customer, but it can be done.”

Today, ESA has evolved into the largest professional trade association in the industry, making an impact on Capitol Hill, addressing frequent and ongoing technology changes, providing industry-specific insurance solutions through SARRG and the most comprehensive training through the ESA National Training School (NTS). 

“As we look to the future, and as the association grows, we need to accept change, just as you do in your business. We need to be flexible and ready to make adjustments,”he says.

 Marshall Alarm Systems Corp
Marshall Marinace began his career as
an installer, launching Marshall Alarm
Systems Corp. in 1976

Currently, ESA has six critical strategic initiatives, long-range plans that tie to its overall mission and vision to 'lead the electronic life safety, security and systems integration industry for the benefit of our members, consumers and public safety.' Those key initiatives and his thoughts include:

1. Training & Certification: Identify, develop, deliver and certify professional education for the electronic life safety, security and systems integration industry

2. Government Relations: Effectively advocate and communicate on behalf of members before Congress, federal regulatory agencies, and, as requested, at state and local levels.

3. Technology and Emerging Issues: Identify industry issues and communicate their potential impact on membership.

4. Public Awareness: Effectively promote the professionalism and expertise of members to consumers, public safety officials and regulatory agencies.

5. Codes & Standards: Enhance public safety by proactively monitoring, influencing and developing codes and standards that affect electronic life safety, security and integrated systems.

6. Organizational Excellence: Operate a world-class association that serves members by delivering exceptional value.

Marinace says ESA has made incredible strides in representing the industry, but there is more work to be done, and he encourages everyone to look at how they can assist.

“Together, we can continue to elevate the stature of the industry. But it takes everyone’s input, participation and support. Membership works, but only if you do.”